Eat Healthy With Your Own Organic Garden

Growing an organic garden might appear very complicated and involved, but if you know what you are doing, it can be a very exciting experience. If you don't know what you are doing, you can waste a lot of money and watch alot of your plants die. The tips listed below can help you avoid this.

For the fall season, plant a few fall edible plants in your garden containers. Beautiful selections of kale and mustard greens, have lovely shades of greens and purples and offer different textures to the arrangement. Add a few edible pansies to bring color to the green textures. The combination is fetching and will last well into the winter.

It is crucial that you have the proper tools before starting a garden. You do not want to begin the process of starting a garden only to realize that you are in need of a tool you do not have. Try to get shovels, trowels, pruners, hoes, garden forks, and rakes.

When deciding to take up gardening, it is important to study and know your geographical area. Some vegetation simply can't survive a northern winter. Contrarily, some plants can't survive a Texas summer. As such, it is important to know where you are and what the plants that you intend on growing can handle.

An excellent way to store the goodies from a homegrown garden is to freeze them in small batches. Using small sealable plastic bags and cutting small amounts of fresh vegetables every few days will help store the extras from the garden. Just bag and toss in the freezer and the packets can be added at any time to soups and pastas year round.

Brighten up your winter garden with trees that have interesting bark. A winter garden can tend to look bare and drab, especially if you live in a very cold climate. Three good choices are a paperbark maple, silver birch or scarlet willow. This will make a quite noticeable difference to the look of your garden.

When you are working in your garden, be sure to leave the praying mantis alone. These insects are skilled predators which take care of any number of harmful pests. In addition, these praying mantises do not harm your garden in any way, so let them go about their work protecting your garden from pests.

Plant in the shade. All plants need light to survive, but not all of them need brilliant sunshine. Plants native to woodland areas are happy when they get protection from the sun's rays. There are many plants that will thrive in a shady garden, including Hosta, Cyclamen, Foxglove, Helleborus, Japanese Anemone, and Ajuga. By planting these, you will have a year-round display of color in even the shadiest of gardens.

It is possible to grow an organic garden all year if you have a sufficient light source for an indoor garden. Plants need plenty of light in order to grow properly and there are bulbs that can be purchased to provide indoor gardens with the appropriate amount of light to have them thrive and produce a fruitful bounty.

To fight off weeds in a natural way, make your own homemade weedkiller. Simply mix water and white vinegar in a bottle, and spray it the same way you would a normal weedkiller. As an added bonus, the vinegar solution will also serve as a source of nutrients to your plants.

You should check your gardening tools on a regular basis to make sure that they are still in good condition. Sheers, pruners and lawn mower blades all become dull after many uses. You can easily sharpen the blades yourself or have a professional sharpen them. By sharpening the blades you will not have to replace the tools altogether.

Just think of the beautiful harvest you can add to your dining table from your garden. Not to mention the environmentally friendly impact of growing your own food. Maintaining a personal vegetable garden can provide food at low cost to your family -- and wait until you savor the amazing taste of vegetables, picked straight from the plant. Store-bought produce never tasted this good!

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